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A Technology Self-Assessment for
Special Education Professors

A. Edward Blackhurst, Elizabeth A. Lahm, Margaret E. Bausch, and
Jennifer K. Bell
National Assistive Technology Research Institute

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Description

A self-assessment checklist that special education professors or doctoral students
can use in designing a professional development program

Content

Directions

Print a copy of this self-assessment. For each of the statements listed, indicate your level of knowledge and skills. Circle the letter that best reflects your opinion. Place an asterisk next to the items that would be of highest priority for your professional development. The results of your ratings can be used to establish objectives for the development of a technology continuing education program. Use the following Key:
N = No knowledge or skills in this area
A = Limited knowledge in this area; Need to increase awareness
S = Have awareness; Need to develop skills in this area.
E = Have some skills in this area; Need to refine and expand them
T = Have good knowledge and skills; Can teach about this topic

Select and Operate Technology Equipment and Software

1.

Conduct comparative analyses of computer hardware, software, and related technology products in order to make purchase decisions.

 N 
 A 
 S 
 E 
 T 

2.

Set up technology equipment and test it to ensure that it will operate correctly.

N
A
S
E
T

3.

Install peripheral devices, such as modems, printers, CD-ROM drives, and scanners to enhance the capabilities of a computer system.

N
A
S
E
T

4.

Install application programs, set user preferences, and configure the software to ensure that all of its features will work properly with the technology equipment being used.

N
A
S
E
T

5.

Use a computer operating system and utilities to format disks, and copy, rename, backup, and delete computer files.

N
A
S
E
T

6.

Develop a system for organizing and managing mass storage devices, such as hard disks, CD-ROMs, and removable storage media.

N
A
S
E
T

7.

Use system utilities such as macros, screen capture programs, desk accessories, scrapbooks, virus checkers, and screen savers to enhance computer system capabilities.

N
A
S
E
T

8.

Use simple diagnostics and technical assistance resources to identify and resolve problems and perform routine maintenance of hardware and software.

N
A
S
E
T

9.

Install software and hardware upgrades as they become available.

N
A
S
E
T

10.

Run software programs on different computer systems.

N
A
S
E
T

Use Technology to Aid Personal Productivity

11.

Use a word processor to prepare correspondence, presentation notes, manuscripts and other written documents.

N
A
S
E
T

12.

Use software utilities, such as mail merging programs, appointment schedulers, outliners, and spelling checkers.

N
A
S
E
T

13.

Use database programs to maintain records, organize and sort information, generate reports, and prepare mailing labels.

N
A
S
E
T

14.

Use a spreadsheet program to develop budgets, create tables, manipulate numerical data, generate graphs, and manage fiscal records.

N
A
S
E
T

15.

Use drawing and painting programs to generate and modify graphic images.

N
A
S
E
T

16.

Use electronic communication resources such as electronic mail, newsgroups, and discussion lists.

N
A
S
E
T

17.

Use the World Wide Web to locate information.

N
A
S
E
T

Use Technology to Conduct Research and Disseminate Findings

18.

Conduct searches of the professional literature using electronic databases, such as ERIC.

N
A
S
E
T

19.

Use the Internet to locate information sources, access information, transfer data files, and disseminate research findings.

N
A
S
E
T

20.

Use software programs to maintain files of reference materials, annotations, and bibliographies to support research and writing.

N
A
S
E
T

21.

Use technology, such as personal digital assistants and observational data recording software, to collect research data.

N
A
S
E
T

22.

Perform quantitative or qualitative data analyses with computer software programs.

N
A
S
E
T

23.

Use graphics software to prepare charts and graphs for presentations and research manuscripts.

N
A
S
E
T

24.

Use software programs to generate timelines and research project management plans.

N
A
S
E
T

25.

Participate as a member of a technology product design and development team.

N
A
S
E
T

26.

Design forms and related procedures for collecting data via the World Wide Web.

N
A
S
E
T

Use Technology for Pre-Service and In-Service Instruction

27.

Use technology systems to prepare instructional materials, such as transparencies and presentation graphics.

N
A
S
E
T

28.

Set up and use equipment to project computer images, and visual images from videotapes, videodiscs, and CD-ROM discs.

N
A
S
E
T

29.

Use presentation software programs to support the delivery of instruction.

N
A
S
E
T

30.

Set up and use assistive technologies to facilitate participation of students with disabilities in pre-service and in-service education programs.

N
A
S
E
T

31.

Use computer programs to support tutorial, discovery, drill and practice, simulation, and problem solving activities for students.

N
A
S
E
T

32.

Store questions in computerized test banks and generate examinations.

N
A
S
E
T

33.

Use gradebook or spreadsheet software programs to manage, calculate, and report student grades.

N
A
S
E
T

34.

Design, develop, deliver, and evaluate distance education programs across a continuum of no-tech to high-tech instructional delivery systems.

N
A
S
E
T

Provide Instruction about Technology Applications in Special Education

35.

Explain ethical considerations related to uses of technology in special education.

N
A
S
E
T

36.

Define terms and concepts related to technology applications in special education.

N
A
S
E
T

37.

Identify major issues associated with the use of technology in special education.

N
A
S
E
T

38.

Articulate a philosophy and goals for using technology in special education.

N
A
S
E
T

39.

Describe research on technology use in special education.

N
A
S
E
T

40.

Infuse information about technology into special education courses throughout the pre-service curriculum.

N
A
S
E
T

41.

Teach ways to evaluate technology and computer software for its potential in the instruction of special education students.

N
A
S
E
T

42.

Select and demonstrate software programs that are appropriate for use with special education students.

N
A
S
E
T

43.

Teach how to use assistive technologies to enable people with disabilities to respond to demands placed on them from the environment.

N
A
S
E
T

44.

Teach how uses of technology tools, such as word processors, databases, and telecommunications can be used with special education students.

N
A
S
E
T

45.

Demonstrate commercial software programs designed to analyze the results of educational assessments and generate individualized education plans.

N
A
S
E
T

46.

Teach how to integrate technology into curricula for special education students.

N
A
S
E
T

47.

Provide information about resources available to support the use of technology in special education.

N
A
S
E
T

48.

Teach how to evaluate the effectiveness of technology applications in special education.

N
A
S
E
T

 Incorporate Technology Applications into Service Responsibilities

49.

Conduct needs assessments related to the use of technology in special education.

N
A
S
E
T

50.

Provide consultation and technical assistance about the use of technology to special education teachers and related personnel.

N
A
S
E
T

51.

Participate in the development of plans for the use of technology in a variety of special education settings

N
A
S
E
T

52.

Provide in-service training about technology use in special education.

N
A
S
E
T

53.

Provide information related to the selection and purchase of technology products to facilitate special education and related services.

N
A
S
E
T

54.

Identify sources of funding for technology hardware and related products for special education programs.

N
A
S
E
T

55.

Prepare proposals for the funding of special education technology projects.

N
A
S
E
T

Add any other items that are of interest to you but do not appear in the above list:

 

 

 

 

 

 

Prioritize your preferences for professional development by rank-ordering the asterisked statements.

Credits and Disclaimers

A Technology Self-Assessment for Special Education Professors (© 2001) was prepared by the following staff of the National Assistive Technology Research Institute (NATRI): A. Edward Blackhurst, Technology Consultant; Elizabeth A. Lahm, Co-Principal Investigator; Margaret E. Bausch, Project Director; and Jennifer K. Bell, Research Associate.

NATRI, a Partner in the TAM Technology Instructional Resources Initiative, is operated by the Department of Special Education and Rehabilitation Counseling at the University of Kentucky. The self-assesment may be duplicated and circulated for noncommercial purposed, provided this credit is included.

This self-assessment is based on a 1988 national study that was conducted to identify microcomputing competencies for special education professors. A task analysis was conducted in an effort to broaden the 1988 list of knowledge and skills and bring it up to date. Following is the citation for the original study:

Blackhurst, A. E., MacArthur, C. A., & Byrom, E. (1988). Microcomputing competencies for special education professors. Teacher Education and Special Education. 10, 153-160.

Reactions to the self-assessment and suggestions for additions, deletions, and modifications to the list would be greatly appreciated. They can be e-mailed to the first author, A. Edward Blackhurst, at blakhrst@uky.edu

Support for the preparation of this self-assessment instrument was provided by the University of Kentucky and the Research to Practice Division of the Office of Special Education Programs in the U. S. Department of Education under Cooperative Agreement #H327G000004. The self-assessment does not necessarily reflect the endorsement or official position of the funding agencies.

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Posted March 15, 2002